We have moved! Please visit us at ANTHROECOLOGY.ORG. This website is for archival purposes only.


May 02 2012

First Group Field Day

On Saturday 4/29/2012 we had the first field day of the semester. The goal was to begin mapping the trees at HR and to perfect our methods. However we soon discovered that our 5x5 meter plots that had been previously marked with PVC had much more error than we anticipated. To accommodate this we mapped the trees in the corners of 25x25 meter plots because they contained the known survey points.

We managed to get 8 of the 5x5 Meter plots surveyed and ready to document. Also, we have determined a new method to plot the 5x5 meter subplots. Our error came from one main source. When we were measuring the 5x5 subplots we started by marking the perimeter. Once this was done we laid out a string across the plot and measured along the string to mark our subplot points. While the points were 5 meters apart in one direction they were not in the other. The reference string did not provide enough accuracy and would lead to a line of points which fall to the left or the right of where they should fall.

To tackle this problem we purchased a straight line laser that can shoot up to 1000ft. The idea behind this is it will give us a perfectly straight reference line. We will shoot the laser across the plot from one known perimeter point to the next and than proceed to mark the points within the plot that lay on this line. This will hopefully do away with the error that accumulates while measuring along an inaccurate reference line.

At the end of the day we learned allot about our methods and what needs to be improved. This is all a part of field work to design, test, and redesign. Hopefully we will have another group field day soon with corrected subplots allowing much more mapping to be accomplished. I want to thank everyone from the ecosynth team and volunteers who made this day possible. 

Apr 25 2012

Finishing up Herbert Run

Saturday April 21st  , Shelby, Dana and I went out to Herbert Run and were able to get a lot done in in the field. We were able to set a decent amount of control points as well as make progress during the stake-out by obtaining roughly 8 more points. The points we were able to get were the ones on the far Eastern edge of Herbert Run 168-175. This leaves us with about 8 or so points left that need to be mapped out and I am convinced that with Dana's help today and a little help Friday that I will be able to complete the Survey either Saturday or Sunday at Herbert Run. Then next week I can do the complete Survey for The Knoll.

This data collector is helping a lot. At Landesign Inc. the data collector I used was no where near as nice as this one is. It can connect to the internet, which could make stake out really convenient. As displayed in the picture on the left the Trimble actually pulls up a complete map of the Survey that I will do. The points you see on the screen are the ones that I have loaded in. It also has my control points which you can see towards the top left of the screen as point numbers 4004 and 4005 These are my traverse 1 and traverse 2. This will be how I establish my traverse loop which because of the small size will probably have quite a small amount of error.

I am considering using existing control at Herbert Run to create control at the Knoll. Since I have specific coordinates for the traverse at Herbert Run I can use those to Run control down to The Knoll. This just means that I will have two traverse loops obviously the one that connects HR to the Knoll is far larger than the one that will be specifically for HR, which entails more error but we can distribute that error evenly throughout the loop and it will be fine.

Finally I am going to need to create the Grid points in GIS this week for The Knoll so that Monday I can get started on that.

Dana also had a great idea when we were out in the field she proposed that we use the GPS to guide us to the points that we are trying to survey. Sometimes these points are in the worst locations such as the points around 170 in Herbert Run and it can be a major hassle trying to read the map and decide what direction and how far is needed to pace to the next point. With the GPS we could get a much better rough estimate of where the next point to be staked out is, for those points that when using the map and actually walking through the forest are impossible to just pace to. This is the situation for large fallen trees in the way, large increases in elevation and streams.

Apr 11 2012

Herbert Run West Surveying & Keystone Rental -- Updates

Saturday April 7th, Shelby and I went out to Herbert Run to stake out some more points on the western portion. We were able to get seven points that are all in the area pictured on the left. A lot of this area was really difficult to get because of the amount of brush that was online but we were able to get them all from a one of the new points that Will had RTK GPS located.

I went to Keystone Precision this morning to ask about renting data collectors, it turns out that they do rent out data collectors and they also give out software packages for them. The rates seem fairly inexpensive at $42.50/day, but they do not rent out prisms. I explained our situation and the sales representative generously said they would let us borrow a prism if we rented the data collector.

The data collectors are called the Ranger, which has a software package called Survey Controller and the TSC2  which has a software package called Survey Pro.

They also had an option to rent an entire total station plus rod set up for $120/day.

The representative at Keystone said that if I were to talk to Brian Wagaman I would be able to have a lot of my questions, (such as information pertaining to the stake out options of the data collector ) , answered.  I vaguely remember the survey company that I used to work for, Landesign Inc, were really big fans of Brian Wagaman’s help with total station questions and data collector trouble shooting issues, he is really approachable.

I believe this is the best way to proceed and hopefully we can rent the data collector and software for this weekend so that I can finish Herbert Run and the Knoll. I can call Brian tomorrow about the data collector rental and hash out the issues with him.

Apr 09 2012

First Test of PVC Markers


On Thursday 4/5/2012 Jonathan and I went to HR with 2 other students to attempt to lay out the PVC pipe that will mark the 5x5 meter grid. Our plan was to lay a reference string between 2 of the serveyed points in the 25x25 meter grid. Once this was done we could measure 5 meters along this line with our wooden poles, string, and line levels to help ensure accuracy. We secured a string between the two wooden poles measured at 5 meters We would than insert PVC poles like the ones to the left at these 5 meter marks. However when we finished our first 4 points and came to the known survey point we were anywhere from 10 to 30 cm off. This was too much inaccuracy and we quickly saw that the string connecting the two wooden poles could flex, this being our cause of inaccuracy, we determined we needed a more rigid material to connect the poles. Back at the lab we found some thin metal wire and after attatching this to the wooden poles and retesting the same strategy as before the accuracy was greatly improved, at most we had a 1 to 2 cm innaccuracy with most of the corner points we plotted landing directly on the survey point.

Apr 04 2012

Hexakopter Flying and Testing the GoPro

Stephen and I practed flying the hexakoptors.  We were able to fly Roflkopter (one of the hexakopters) from the lab to the library, over the library and adjacent garage, and land on a 2ft by 2ft board.  In addition to the lirary expedition, we also practiced maneuvering the hexakopters, landing on a target, and getting them flying at the correct altitude.  Furthermore, we used the GoPro camera to capture video and pictures of the flights.  (The camera was mounted on the hexakopter.)  Unfortunately, the pictures had a lot of compression (as can be seen by the picture to the left that was taken in the lab).  Next week we will be testing to see if adjusting the setting will yield better images.

Below is a link to a video from the GoPro as we flew through Academic Row.  The first half of the video is with the distortion and the second half is the cleaned-up version.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YtPkQShCR8c&context=C451b577ADvjVQa1PpcFNA2j44Y1Kwcn_6Rdo149XVXfaZn7cl70E=

 

 

Mar 27 2012

Topography and the Mapping Grid

There has been a new data sheet designed to address the specific needs of the forest we are working with. Because the method for mapping the trees has changed, the data sheets also needed to be altered. We are returning to the previous used method of laying out a 1x1 meter grid within our 5x5 meter grid. Once this is complete the location of the trees will be marked on the graph found on the data sheet. There has also been a "codes" column added to the data sheet to represent trees that may need special attention. This could include a leaning stem, a stem broken below breast hight, or as seen in the picture multiple stems from one trunk forming below breast height. However, before the trees can be mapped the grid must first be sectioned into 5x5 meter squares. Jonathan, fellow students, and I are hoping to get one of the 25x25 meter plots sectioned off so we can begin to test our tree mapping stratgies. We are also tackling the problems we may face concerning drastic elevation changes. In summary we have all of our supplies ready and in bags we just need to find a time to get dirty and see how our ideas work.


 

Mar 21 2012

Tree mapping Technique

There have been many methods for mapping the trees within our 25x25 meter grid that we have identified. The one certatinty we have decided on is the grid must be sectioned into a 5x5 meter grid before we can begin mapping. The picture on the left shows a method found in the field guide Methods For Establishment And Inventory Of Permanent Plots. This method involves usining geometry to determine the exact point of a tree and we thought it could be more accurate and faster than other ideas. However when we went to our forrest to test we discovered that it was not only more tedious but may not improve accuracy by a reasonable amount if at all. The problems arose when we needed to take measurments on unlevel surfaces. It would involve 3 or more people with much instruction and using handfulls of equpment, it was uneffective for our purposes. We plan on going on another test run before the week ends to try another method that will hopefully work for what we need. 

References:

Dallmeier, F. (1992). "Long-term monitoring of biological diversity in tropical forest areas." Methods for establishment and inventory of permanent plots. MAB Digest Series, 11. UNESCO. Paris

Mar 21 2012

Herbert Run Update

On Monday (3/21/2012), Andrew and I went to Herbert Run to survey more points to make a grid so that we can start mapping trees.  By the end of the day, we finished enough points to have ten 25 by 25 grid points marked and ready for tree mapping.  We begin mapping trees today (3/21/2012).

Mar 16 2012

Updates: Hexakopters, Quad Arducopter and Octocopter.

Now that the hexakopters are basically complete (one has a programming error that we are currently working on), Stephen and I decided to work with our other projects: quad arducopter and octocopter.

The quad arducopter (4 blades) is working.  We spent a few days familiarizing ourselves with the parts of the copter using the arducopter wiki (http://code.google.com/p/arducopter/wiki/ArduCopter).  The electronic speed controller (ECS) still needs to be calibrated, but it the copter is connecting to the computer and seems to be in working order.  We have started the parts list so that we can move forward.

The octocopter (8 blades) is still in the supply obtaining phase.  We have already placed our order for the necessary parts to construct the copter.  Within a few weeks we shall have those supplies and can commence the construction!  The objective of the octocopter is to run the trials the hexakopters are currently doing, but more efficiently.  It is also hoped that we can use the octocopters to expand the scanning area. 

Oct 18 2011

Gatewing UAV Mapping Awarded 'Most Disruptive Innovator'

The Gatewing UAV mapping company was recently acknowledged as the 'Most Disruptive Innovator' at the 2011 Intergeo conference in Germany.  Gatewing sells very high-end solutions for automated RC aircraft mapping with digital cameras, automatically generating orthophotos and DSMs at high resolution.  While the software is proprietary, I have no doubt that it is grounded in both photogrammetry and computer vision.

I have to agree with the award, it is given out "for the innovative application of existing technologies that will cause a significant shift in the market." (Gatewing email, 10/18/2011).  I think that the Ecosynth computer vision approach to ecological remote sensing also represents a disruptive new technology for the research community along those same lines.  Ecosynth is an application of existing technologies that will allow individual ecologists the ability to make very high-quality 3D color scans of landscape vegetation.  The Ecosynth approach means that field researchers can make useful and accurate measurements of study sites using remote sensing, without the need for fixed wing aircraft fly-overs, at relatively low cost, and without being remote sensing experts.  

Now, if only I had realized that the Gatewing office is in Ghent during my family trip in Belgium earlier in the month, 'D'oh!'