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Dec 17 2011

TLS scanning at UMBC

We have been having an exciting time in New Jersey and Baltimore working with aTerrestrial Laser Scanner (TLS; Riegel VZ400) for generating high quality 3D reference datasets for validation of Ecosynth data.  We are in the lab today because of windy conditions, working on post-processing and data management of the large amounts of data collected in New Jersey and in the photo studio at UMBC.  I thought it would be a good time for a short update post.

These pictures are from our test setup of mobile scaffolding that we will use for gaining an elevated perspective on several open grown trees for TLS scanning.  The plan is to set up the scaffolding at each of the 4 orthogonal scan stations with the TLS mounted on the platform as shown.

The tower platform is about 2m above the ground and the TLS scanning head is about 3m off the ground.  The tower can be moved by 3-4 people to each of the scanning positions, after the TLS equipment has been taken down!

We have also configured the TLS for WLAN control, meaning that we can operate scanning and review data wirelessly.  This should be useful for when we attempt TLS scanning from the bucket crane.

Nov 01 2011

Personal remote sensing goes live: Mapping with Ardupilot

Folks all over are waking up to the fact that remote sensing is now something you really should try at home!  Today DIYDrones published a fine example of homebrew 3D mapping using an RC plane, a regular camera, and a computer vision software: hypr3d (one I’ve never heard of).  Hello Jonathan!

 

PS: I’d be glad to pay for a 3D print of our best Ecosynth- hypr3D can do it, so can landprint.com

Oct 14 2011

Mikrokopter and Computer Vision/Photogrammetry used for Landslide Modeling

Researchers at the Universität Stuttgart, Institute for Geophysics in Stuttgart Germany, have used manually flown Mikrokopters and semi-automated photogrammetric software to generate high resolution photo mosaics and digital terrain models of a landslide area for tracking terrain displacement.  

An article published this spring in the journal Engineering Geology demonstrated the value of using remote controlled aircraft and off-the-shelf digital cameras for high resolution digtial terrain modeling.  The researchers used photogrammetry and computer vision software VMS to make 3D terrain models with aerial images and compared the results to aerial LIDAR and TLS terrain models.  A network of ~200 GPS measured ground control points were used to assist with image registration and model accuracy with good results.

The authors appear to agree with our sentiments that RC based aerial photography and 3D scanning has the benefits of low-cost and repeatability compared to traditional fixed wing or satellite based data collections.

Unlike our research, the authors of this study were interested in only the digital terrain model (DTM) and vegetation was considered noise to be removed for more accurate surface modelling.

Again...just one more reason for me to get cranking on that next paper!

Image source: http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Super_sauze_landslide.JPG

Aug 03 2011

Kinect 3D Scanning for Archeologists

As we’ve seen before, Kinect 3D scanning keeps getting more popular all the time, including for outdoor work in the sciences:  “Archaeologists Now Use Kinect to Build 3-D Models During Digs”.

 

Still some clear and major issues with using the Kinect outside and for scanning forests, maybe it is time to give this a try in the lab?

Jun 28 2011

Automated terrestrial multispectral scanning

3D scanning just keeps getting better (but not cheaper!).

A post from Engadget: Topcon's IP-S2 Lite (~$300K) creates panoramic maps in 3D, spots every bump in the road (video) http://www.engadget.com/2011/06/28/topcons-ip-s2-lite-creates-panoramic-maps-in-3d-spots-every-bu/.

More from Topcon:

http://www.topconpositioning.com/products/mobile-mapping/ip-s2

http://global.topcon.com/news/20091204-4285.html

 

In China recently, we had the good fortune to collaborate in using a wonderful new ground-based (terrestrial) LiDAR scanner (TLS) from Riegl: The VZ-400, which fuzes LiDAR scans with images acquired from a digital camera (~$140K). Pictured at left- graduate students of the Chinese Academy of Forestry with us in the field- literally!