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Apr 09 2012

First Test of PVC Markers


On Thursday 4/5/2012 Jonathan and I went to HR with 2 other students to attempt to lay out the PVC pipe that will mark the 5x5 meter grid. Our plan was to lay a reference string between 2 of the serveyed points in the 25x25 meter grid. Once this was done we could measure 5 meters along this line with our wooden poles, string, and line levels to help ensure accuracy. We secured a string between the two wooden poles measured at 5 meters We would than insert PVC poles like the ones to the left at these 5 meter marks. However when we finished our first 4 points and came to the known survey point we were anywhere from 10 to 30 cm off. This was too much inaccuracy and we quickly saw that the string connecting the two wooden poles could flex, this being our cause of inaccuracy, we determined we needed a more rigid material to connect the poles. Back at the lab we found some thin metal wire and after attatching this to the wooden poles and retesting the same strategy as before the accuracy was greatly improved, at most we had a 1 to 2 cm innaccuracy with most of the corner points we plotted landing directly on the survey point.

Mar 20 2012

New Jersey Pinelands Fire Research Flight

This past Tuesday (3/6/12) Jonathan and I travelled to New Jersey to conduct wildfire research.

We left Monday evening and drove to the New Jersey Pinelands, where we stayed overnight at the research center.  Our first obstacle was the smoke research payload.  When Jonathan did this smoke research in the past, he had suspended the payload (consisting chiefly of a smoke detector and data logger) on a tether beneath the hexakopter.  The reasoning behind this was that we needed to keep the payload well away from the air disturbance made by the hexa's propellers.  However, the problem with this method is that the hexakopter is unable to self stabilize under a suspended payload, and ends up swinging the payload wildly and eventually crashing.

Jonathan and I did a brief test to confirm that this behavior was still present with the fire payload, it was.  As a solution, we mounted the payload on top of the hexakopter's dome.  A strip of ribbon attached to the top of the payload served to demonstrate that the propellers did not significantly interfere with the airflow though the payload when it was mounted on top.  The hexakopter was perfectly stable with the top mounted payload. 

Tuesday during the wildfire we flew from the research compound which was downwind of the wildfire in the smoke plume.  The hexakopter flew up in 50 meter increments and back down every half hour or so for several hours.  Overall our data collection was a success.  Towards the end we even had the time to mount a camera on top of the payload to take a rather jittery video of the wildfire from the air.